July 23, 2018

Cycles Approach: Making the Most Progress in the Shortest Time

We've all been there...a new student on the caseload who is maybe 25% intelligible...if that. They have so much to say, but also so many errors. Where do we even begin? It can be overwhelming at first, but there are things you can do that will ensure your child makes excellent progress in the shortest amount of time.


First, you absolutely MUST conduct a thorough evaluation. I'm talking more than just a quick administration of the Goldman Fristoe. Make sure you have as much data and information as you can to determine the best type of treatment for your student. When I have a child who is highly unintelligible, I immediately start by looking for error patterns. It's important to note what sounds are being deleted, distorted, or substituted. If there are substitutions, what are they? Where are the errors occurring - initial, medial, or final position? Are errors consistent across words, phrases, sentences, and conversation? Your formal assessment (i.e. Goldman Fristoe or other articulation test) will provide some data, but I recommend going beyond that. If possible, record a speech sample. You can use sound loaded articulation scenes to help with this.

Once you have a good amount of data, start looking for phonological processes in the child's speech. These are error patterns that occur across a wide variety of words. Examples include deletion of final consonants (saying "ba" instead of "bat"), stopping of fricatives (saying /p/ instead of /f/), or gliding (saying /w/ instead of /l/). The ASHA website has a summary of different phonological processes with examples. Click HERE to see it. I also love this chart from Little Bee Speech. It's important to note which phonological processes are still being used that should have resolved by now (according to the child's age).

If your student is indeed demonstrating some of the phonological processes listed on these charts beyond the age that is considered typical, you know you can proceed with the cycles approach. Using the cycles approach allows your student to make faster progress than they would with traditional articulation therapy. Rather than focusing on one sound error, treatment cycles through the error patterns focusing on one phonological process at a time and cycling through the others. This allows you to work on many targets in a short amount of time. You can read more about the cycles approach on Caroline Bowen's website by clicking HERE. She has a great list of references and information on how to implement the cycles approach.

Here are my personal tips for implementing the cycles approach (please refer back to the websites I mentioned earlier for more specific information on the cycles approach):

1. Identify the phonological processes that may be impacting intelligibility the most. Start with the earlier developing patterns and make a list of all the deficient patterns. It's also a good idea to list which targets the child is stimulable for. This will be your road map as you work through your cycles. I usually focus on 2-3 main phonological processes at a time.

2. Keep a cheat sheet handy to help you as you go through each session. In the Cycles Approach, each session follows the same structure. Having a cheat sheet handy will help you as you get started, so you don't miss any steps. You can download my free Cycles Session Structure handout HERE.

3. Select 4-5 target words to focus on for each session. I use the same 4-5 target words for a total of 60 minutes (either 2 30-minute sessions, or 3 20-minute sessions) before moving on to a new set of targets. For example, if a student is deleting final consonants and fronting, I may work on words with final /p/ for a total of 60 minutes, then move on to words with final /m/. I would then move on to target fronting with initial /k/ for a total of 60 minutes, then initial /g/. I would then go back to final consonants.

4. Use minimal pairs! Using minimal pairs allows the child to begin to hear when they are saying a word incorrectly. I always use minimal pairs when I am working with the Cycles Approach. Minimal pairs are words that are different in only one way...(i.e. bow/boat, tea/key). It's a good idea to keep a set of minimal pair cards handy for each phonological process. I use a minimal pairs bundle I created called Phonology on the Go. Each set in the bundle includes minimal pair cards and data sheets. I can carry these cards with me easily from location to location, or use the no print resources that are included.

5. Encourage home practice. I always include parents and teachers in my treatment. It is so important to provide parents and teachers with the list of target words a child is working on. If I see the child for 20 minutes, 3x per week, they also should be practicing the target words in between sessions. You can jot down the target words on a sticky note for parents/teachers, or send a copy of your target word cards home for them to play memory or even just drill for a couple of minutes. I also demonstrate what a short practice session might look like to show them how quick and easy it can be. The easier it is, the more likely it is going to be done.

This may sound like a lot and be a little overwhelming, but I promise, once you get going, it becomes second nature and you will see so much progress!

Be sure to check out my Phonology on the Go resource, and feel free to contact me if you have any questions!

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July 17, 2018

Five Reasons You Should be Using Sudoku with Your Students



Have you ever tried solving a sudoku puzzle? I often try, but I am not usually successful without cheating...haha. But I truly love solving puzzles and going through the process of trying to solve them.

Many of my students also enjoy solving puzzles, but often find standard number sudoku puzzles too difficult. That's why I began creating picture sudoku puzzles to use with my students. I have sudoku puzzles for articulation, language, and book companions. My sudoku pages are great for all levels and I have even used them with students as young as 5 years old. Today, I am sharing 5 reasons why I absolutely LOVE using sudoku with my students.

1. They are highly engaging. Every time I pull out my sudoku pages, I instantly have my students' full attention. They think the puzzles are so fun, which keeps them engaged. It doesn't feel like work. Many of my students often ask for more...just for fun!

2. I can easily differentiate. I never have students who are on the exact same level academically. Sudoku puzzles come in a variety of difficulty levels. When I use my sudoku pages with my students, we can all be working on the same activity, but each student has a level appropriate for their ability.

3. They require no prep! Sudoku worksheets can be printed and used with absolutely no prep required. I have even have friends who have used them on the smart board as a group activity. Need to save paper? Print once and use them in sheet protectors with dry erase markers.

4. They are great for executive functioning skills. Completing a sudoku puzzle requires the ability to pay attention, self-monitor, organize and plan. When I use sudoku with my students, we are always working on these skills. It's not just about solving the puzzle, but also learning how to focus on certain sections, use the information on the page, and think through possible solutions. The harder these pages get, the more focus and persistence is required. It's a great way to help students learn how to work through a challenge.

5. They are so versatile. You can use sudoku pages as large group activities, with small groups, individuals, or even as homework. The opportunities are endless!

If you want to try using sudoku with your students, I have several FREE options for you to try. Click on the titles to download from my Teachers Pay Teachers store.  Don't know how to do sudoku? Just start out with one of my level 1 pages and go from there. You'll get it in no time!

FREE Articulation Sampler

FREE There was an Old Lady who Swallowed a Fly book companion

FREE Earth Day vocabulary

If you're looking for more sudoku options, click the following titles:

Articulation Sudoku Mega Bundle

Langauge Sudoku

Old Lady Sudoku Bundle

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